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Police Commissioners Vote Today

Today (Thursday 15th) the new police and crime commissioners are being elected and there’s a big danger pro-privatisation candidates could get in with just a few votes.

That’s why we need to sound the alarm and get our friends and family to the polling stations armed with the facts. Over the last few days, 38 Degrees members have emailed all the candidates to find out who supports privatisation. You can see what your candidates say about privatisation below.

Voting is easy - you just go along to your polling station, probably the same place as you would vote in a general election. Polling stations are open from 7am until 10pm so it's easy to go before or after work and you don't even need to bring your polling card with you.

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Click to see the responses for the candidates in your area:

Avon and Somerset
Bedfordshire
Cambridgeshire
Cheshire
Cleveland
Cumbria
Derbyshire
Devon and Cornwall
Dorset
Durham
Dyfed Powys
Essex
Gloucestershire
Greater Manchester
Gwent
Hampshire
Hertfordshire
Humberside
Kent
Lancashire
Leicestershire
Lincolnshire
Merseyside
Norfolk
Northamptonshire
Northumbria
North Wales
North Yorkshire
Nottinghamshire
South Wales
South Yorkshire
Staffordshire
Suffolk
Surrey
Sussex
Thames Valley
Warwickshire
West Mercia
West Midlands
West Yorkshire
Wiltshire

Avon and Somerset - Gwent | Hampshire - Nottinghamshire | South Wales - Wiltshire

Avon and Somerset

Dr. John Christopher Savage (Labour)

These are difficult times. More is expected of our police while budgets are cut. There are no easy answers but I will ensure the police service prioritises neighbourhood policing over privatisation and that the service really listens to the public it serves.

Ken Maddock (Conservatives)

I can absolutely confirm that there is no question of privatising the police. As the Home Secretary has made crystal clear, the crime fighters will remain police officers, patrolling will not be privatised and policing will remain a public service, accountable to the people and carried out by consent. The law prevents the jobs police officers do from being delivered by private contractors beyond the limited powers of transport and custody conferred by the last Labour government.

When it comes to the work that goes on behind the scenes - things like administration, IT and maintenance - if savings can be made by collaborating with other police forces, other emergency services, local authorities or private companies I will look at them. It is vital that as much of our policing budget as possible is directed to frontline policing, and not wasted on expensive and inefficient administration.

Pete Levy (LibDems)

I understand that it will be within the remit of the PCCs office to have an influential input into the question of privatisation. To a degree there is already an element of privatisation within Avon and Somerset Police around support functions and 'back office' elements. With a significant cut from the policing budget imposed as a result of the comprehensive spending review these measures have meant that front line policing is maintained. With specific regard to the question of the privatisation of front line services then I'm more than happy to make a commitment that I will do everything in my power to work with the police to ensure this doesn't happen. Warranted Police Officers earn their salary through training, hard work, dedication, commitment and experience and that is not for privatising. The failings of such a short sighted approach has been significantly highlighted around such issues as the Olympic security provision and the use of companies such as G4S. Thankfully with regards to that particular fiasco our Police and Military personnel stepped up and ensured the situation was maintained.

I have been asked if I have any links with any companies who may have an interest in privatisation in policing and I'm happy to say that I don't.

Sue Mountstevens (Independent)

There will be no privatisation of core police functions and I have no contacts with any companies that might be interested in such contracts.

Bedfordshire

Jas Parmar (Conservatives)

Privatising the police force is a figment of imagination of the Labour Party and Unison. I certainly aim to streamline and cost save. I hope to achieve this by working with other police authorities not just Cambridgeshire and Hertfordshire but Suffolk, Norfolk and maybe Essex.

Some of the other authorities have excellent departments covering HR, payroll, IT etc. and I would much prefer to contract with them for such services.>>

However, there may be cost savings available but any such move would have to guarantee the same service that is available now. I am not prepared to rule anything out or anything in at the moment. I am certainly not impressed with G4S and will not be rushing to sign their contract. I have no business connections whatsoever with such organisations. My business has been involved in the food and retail industry.

My role would be to find efficiencies and pass any savings on to the funding of front line police.My political affiliation has never affected my everyday dealing with the public or job in hand. I will be elected to serve the public without the political influence from the party and I would do that impartially.

Kevin Carroll (British Freedom Party)

No response forwarded to the office

Linda Jack (LibDems)

As my manifesto makes clear I am totally against privatising the police in general and the G4S contract in particular. I have also got a statement on my website on the issue here.

As a Bedfordshire resident you may remember that as Branch Secretary of Beds CC Unison (as Linda Weerasirie then) I campaigned against the disastrous HBS outsourcing which ended up costing us all millions. I frankly despair at the marketisation of public services which if elected I would continue to fight against. So to answer your question, my opposition remains whether that is G4S or any other private company.

I have no links to any private companies, further since the PCC does not take a whip my first loyalty (as it always has been) will be to the people of Bedfordshire.

Mezanur Rashid (Independent)

No response forwarded to office

Olly Martins (Labour)

I am happy to confirm that if I am elected as Bedfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner next week I will not sign up to the contract to privatise large parts of our police to G4S, or anything similar. This has consistently been my position since the proposal first emerged this summer.

My Tory opponent on the other hand seems to have taken a number of different positions. I would therefore ask you to consider whether on this issue you should trust someone with a consistent and principled position such as myself, or someone whose position seems opaque and moveable to say the least.

I can also confirm that I have no connection to G4S or any other firm seeking privatised policing contracts.

Cambridgeshire

Ansar Ali (Independent)

G4S is a discredited organisation and will not be entertained by me as your Police and Crime Commissioner.

Neither I or any of my family members have any interest in any companies that may wish to tender for work from the Police.

I believe public services are best delivered by the Public Sector and NOT private companies interested in making profit for the shareholders. I will be looking to develop collaborative and partnership working with Local Authorities, neighbouring Police Services and the Voluntary and Community Sector organisations.

Ed Murphy (Labour)

The existing Police Authority was headed towards the edge of a cliff and at too fast a pace before I intervened to halt G4S privatisation plans earlier this summer. The Conservative candidate is out of touch with public opinion and obsessed with privatisation - and I invite other candidates to express their views clearly. After the fiasco of G4S at the Olympics, the highest profile event in the world with a huge budget and massive security risks, how can we really be expected to have confidence if those responsible for our safety and wellbeing are accountable to shareholders above the public they serve? I am the only candidate that can beat the Conservative and stop these G4S privatisation plans. It has becomes established practice that one off events retain their own stewards. That does not affect policing or crime reduction, not does it affect the accountability of the police to the public. Of course the police service buys in goods and services from the private sector and will continue to do so - we won't make our own cars, computers or coffee cups. But I will not countenance the extension of the private sector into any front line or police support services currently undertaken by officers and staff whose accountability is to the public. There will be no reduction in public accountability and never will the interests of private shareholders be in a position where they might clash or take precedence over accountability to the public. In simple language - no police privatisation.

Farooq Mohammed (Independent)

The nature of police work is about supporting victims of crime, reducing crime and preventing crime. Corporate aims of external companies/organisations do not match these social aims and for that reason if no other, we will not privatise. Customer service must come first, putting the needs and wishes of the people before bottom line profits.

On G4S: I am not comfortable with policing data being made available to any external company, although I am keeping an open mind when it comes to certain types of support services which could perhaps be provided from a central place (within the police) in collaboration with other forces. Technology offers opportunities to provide selective services more efficiently and I would be open to exploring these as long as the correct processes are put in place to maintain high standards throughout. We do have to be realistic in these difficult economic conditions when the government is expecting all of us (families, businesses and public services) to play our part.

Do you have any connection to companies that might be interested in police contracts? Emphatically no.

Paul Bullen (UKIP)

I'm totally against the privatisation of our Police Force and am not connected with any other company.

Rupert Moss-Eccardt (LibDems)

- Can you promise not to privatise Cambridgeshire police services?
- Will you allow companies like G4S to get involved in the running of Cambridgeshire police?
- Do you have any connection to companies that might be interested in police contracts?

I will not privatise the Police Service. It is a public service and profit should not feature in its delivery.
I will certainly not be letting companies such as G4S get involved. Broadbrush outsourcing does not work.

Specifically in answer to the third bullet, I am currently working on a project for BT. Obviously, BT has a number of contracts with the police and other emergency services. (If I am elected, I shall hand in my notice and negotiate a rapid release with my employer.)

Others may have said things about using no commercial organisations. That is simply not possible. For example, there are no longer any non-commercial forensic laboratories. But the point remains that those people doing police work should be the police.

I will say that, where there is some sort of supplier to Cambridgeshire, I will make sure the contract is worded to make it clear that those doing the work are accountable to the Commissioner who will have the authority to go with it. This type of contract is common in the information assurance world.

Sir Graham Bright (Conservatives)

Privatising the police force is a figment of imagination of the Labour Party and Unison. I certainly aim to streamline and cost save. I hope to achieve this by working with other police authorities not just Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire but Suffolk, Norfolk and maybe Essex.

Some of the other authorities have excellent departments covering HR, payroll, IT etc. and I would much prefer to contract with them for such services.

However, there may be cost savings available but any such move would have to guarantee the same service that is available now. I am not prepared to rule anything out or anything in at the moment. I am certainly not impressed with G4S and I have no business connections whatsoever with such organisations. My business has been involved in the food industry.

My role would be to find efficiencies and pass any savings on to the funding of front line police.

Stephen Goldspink (English Democrats)

*Can you promise not to privatise Cambridgeshire police services?
Yes I can. I don't believe that outsourcing of police services is right, not because of political ideology, but because I have seen what happens when services are outsourced. A contractor promising good service and partnership will actually be aiming to make as big a profit as possible; it is not healthy for the police to depend on such companies to deliver the services that residents expect. I have been called in to turn around three failing contracts on behalf of disillusioned clients and in each case they cost more and delivered much less than the previous in-house arrangement.

The fact that the Cambridgeshire Constabulary are almost ready to sign the contract show that the Police Authority politicians from the three major parties think it was alright - although their PCC candidates seem to say otherwise. Don't believe what they say.

*Will you allow companies like G4S to get involved in the running of Cambridgeshire police?
No, I will not. I would immediately abandon negotiations with G4S and instead concentrate on improving in-house management.

*Do you have any connection to companies that might be interested in police contracts?
No, I do not, and I never have had.

Cheshire

Ainsley Arnold (LibDems)

I am firmly committed to policing being undertaken by Police Officers.

The Police and Crime Commissioner is replacing the police authority and it will be that person who will formulate the policing plan and hold the Chief Constable to account over policing performance in Cheshire and set the budget.

Companies like G4S have demonstrated that they are incapable of running of services efficiently, so I would strongly resist any initiative that I considered would be to the detriment of Cheshire Policing.

To answer your final question I have no connection with any company that would be interested in police contracts.

As a past Vice Chairman of the Police Authority I am acutely aware of the excellent work our police officers do in keeping Cheshire a safe place for us all to live, and if elected I want to ensure that our police officers are fully supported in their roles.

John Dwyer (Conservatives)

No response forwared to office

John Stockton (Labour)

I will not be allowing the further expansion of private sector contracts in Cheshire Police (currently 9% of budget is spent in private sector - I will be looking to return these contracts to the public or voluntary sector, where I can). I will not let companies like G4S become involved in Cheshire policing. I have no connection to any private sector companies interested in police contracts.

Louise Bours (UKIP)

No candidate can make 'promises' regarding budgetary commitments, if they did they would be disingenuous - this is a new role, completely uncharted waters, the entire scope of the Commissioner will only be revealed to the successful candidate, however, considering the recent Olympics fiasco created by G4S, I would be amazed if anyone considered privatizing any aspect of the police service. I believe G4S lost several prison contracts just yesterday.

I can confirm that neither I nor any members of my family, have any connection to any kind of company who would seek tender for any service already provided by the constabular

Sarah Flannery (Independent)

1. Privatisation of Cheshire police services.
I don't think that private sector expertise, in and of itself, is negative. In some instances such as technology it makes sense to look at the best that is available and utilise it where there are clear benefits for public safety. There are also many examples I can think of, such as victim support, where commissioning services from outside the police service could be of benefit.

That said, I am implacably opposed to privatisation by stealth. I believe in our public services. I want to support their development, their value for money, and our confidence in their ability to deliver successful delivery of results.

So my first response will always be to consider how they can evolve and develop, using private/community/voluntary/third sector involvement only where I believe it can accelerate best practice.

In those instances I would make the commissioning process as clear and transparent as possible and seek to commission any such work or services from within Cheshire if possible to benefit the local economy and community cohesion.

I can also promise that I will never allow profitability to compromise public safety.

2. Will you allow companies such as G4S to be involved in running Cheshire police?
My remit as PCC is to be democratically responsible for the strategic direction of the Cheshire Police force. In all of my campaigning, I have not witnessed any desire that companies such as G4S be involved and, as the voice of the people, I will respect the wishes of the people. The Chief Constable retains responsibility for all operational running of the Cheshire Police force.

3 Do you have any connection to companies which may be interested in police contracts?
No, neither I nor any members of my family have ever had any connection to companies that have, or may have, an interest in police contracts.

Cleveland

Barry Coppinger (Labour)

The simple answer is no, I won’t privatise front-line policing and I do not have any links to any private companies.

Joe Michna (Green Party)

My general political inclination is to be opposed to privatisation, particularly in the Police Force. I consider that privatisation detracts from the concepts of team working and having a shared ethos and goals within any public sector organisation.

It also detracts from a sense of ownership and involvement in providing public services. It can create artificial boundaries within organisations and this can impact on service delivery, performance and efficiency.

I have no connections, financial or otherwise to any companies that may be involved in Police contracts. My only paid employment is with the Hartlepool Citizens Advice Bureau and I also receive the Basic Allowance of 6,100 pounds from Middlesbrough Council for my Councillor duties.

The difficulty as always with issues such as privatisation is the financial situation of any public sector organisation. Here I refer to falling income/revenue and how public sector organisations respond to such a situation.

If elected as Police and Crime Commissioner for Cleveland, I have no plans to extend privatisation within the Force.

My position both personally and politically, is to do everything possible to resist any further attempts to privatise public services, or parts of such services, including the Police Force. The Green Party itself, you will find, is very supportive of public services being kept exactly that ' public services' provided by staff with a shared ethos and shared aims and objectives and employed by the public service organisation itself.

Faced with falling income, I would seek to do everything possible to avoid the need for any further privatisation. I would:

- look at reorganisation
- look at new working methods/models
- look at suggestions/ideas from staff members
- seek voluntary redundancies, if necessary
- look at all other appropriate options.

Ken Lupton (Conservatives)

My background is in the public sector, as a Managing Director of a local authority Direct Labour Organisation, and I am committed to the provision of in house services. However, they must be seen to be cost effective and efficient and provide good value. Therefore they need to be challenged but I never lost a contract and do believe that there is a difference in the ethos of a private and a public sector organisation.

I did not agree with the way the "back office" services were contracted out and it has tied the PCC into a 10 year contract that removes the flexibility that would have been available if it had remained under his control.

I am not associated in any way with any outside companies but I am a Non Executive Director of a Hospital Trust in the area.

Sultan Alam (Independent)

I have very serious concerns about the Steria contract. This does not appear to have been a well thought out decision because only two years into a 10 year contract there appear to be very serious ongoing issues. Not only is there very low moral but there is considerable frustration among the police officers due to the procedures in place for police employees interacting with Steria staff.

I will be looking very closely at this contract to find ways in which it can either be re-negotiated or terminated but, unfortunately, I will not know the full extent of the issues unless/until I am elected. This was definitely a case of privatisation gone too far. I will not privatise anything in Cleveland police except for entirely non-operational/non police function(s), (if such a function still exists!!!) and I will be staying as far away from companies such as G4S as possible!

I have no connections - no matter how remote - with any company that may bid for police contract(s).

Cumbria

Mary Robinson (Independent)

I am completely against any privatisation of front line or back office services and have no connection with any companies who may wish to have contracts with the Police. I am certainly against any companies like G4s getting involved, perhaps you need to ask the same question of Theresa May who is in Penrith tomorrow supporting Richard Rhodes as I believe she is a shareholder in G4S.

Patrick Leonard (Labour)

If I am elected next Thursday I can assure you that core policing functions in Cumbria will NOT be privatised! G4S will not get near the place - and no, I do not have connections to any private companies.

Pru Jupe (LibDems)

I've been explicitly clear in my manifesto on the subject of police privatisation. I will not allow private companies like G4S to do front line police work and have no connections with private security firms.

Richard Rhodes (Conservatives)

* Can you promise not to privatise Cumbria police services?
I have no aspiration or intention at all of privatising front line police services. However, the first Police and Crime Commissioner will have to make further significant savings. Salaries account for some 85% of total expenditure. Many capital assets (such as police stations) have already been sold off to generate savings. The public want to see high visibility for their police force. If savings are to be made and front line policing is to be maintained the PCC will have to consider a range of options to achieve this. These may include:-

- Increase the Precept to provide for front line policing
- Ensure that uniformed offices are in the front line and replace their administrative roles with civilians at reduced cost.
- Reduce the overall number of ancillary service staff.
- Investigate the opportunity to put ancillary services out to tender if this can achieve reduced expenditure and yet maintain a desirable level of service.
- Discussions with local authorities and local constabularies about alternative schemes for sharing specific administrative functions and thereby reduce costs.
- Ongoing consultation with members of the public about what they want from their police force.
- Discussions with the 'family' group of Police Forces - i.e. those in rural locations with a sparse population about how services can be maintained. This to include an approach to government to explain the particularly high costs of, for example, transport, for a rural force.

- or a combination of some of these. The aim of such activity would be to provide scope to maintain the level of front line policing that the public wants.

None of these is likely to be popular - but some measures will be necessary. You may have other ideas so please let me know - probably after the election result is known, if it is to be my job to take things forward.

It is worth saying that none of the PCC candidates have seen a detailed account of current income and expenditure in Cumbria so all of the above is subject to consideration of much more detail than has been made available to us so far.

In the short term anyway, I don't see the possibility of there being a relaxation in the financial requirements of the government. No major political party has said that it would or could reverse this process if it was in power. In any event, the new elected PCC has to have the 2013 - 14 budget signed off by 21st December!

*Will you allow companies like G4S to get involved in the running of Cumbria police?
Competition law requires that if there is to be any form of competitive tendering, it has to be open and fair and as such should be accessible to any applicant. Anything other than this will render the process invalid and open to legal challenge. You will recall what has happened in the West Coast Main line tendering this year. Virgin threatened to challenge the process in Court and the Government had to back down.

You will also recall that much of that challenge centred on a statement which Virgin see as prejudicial to their prospects. My judgement is that even a statement from me now about any preference I might have could well be used in future if there was to be a challenge to any process that might take place.

What I can say is that my experience gained from the work of the Probation Trust in Cumbria suggests to me that national contracts do not always achieve either the quality of service that we need - nor the important sense of localism.

* Do you have any connection to companies that might be interested in police contracts?
I have no connection with any companies that might be interested in police contracts.

Derbyshire

Alan Charles (Labour)

* Can you promise not to privatise Derbyshire police services? Yes

* Will you allow companies like G4S to get involved in the running of Derbyshire police? No

* Do you have any connection to companies that might be interested in police contracts? No

David Gale (UKIP)

Please visit this page to see my position on the matters raised in your questions: http://www.davidgaleukip.org.uk/index.php/80-editorial/81-manifesto

To answer your last question directly, I do not have any links to any companies interested in police contracts and have a track record of holding government to account on lobbied interests of suppliers as a brief Google search will demonstrate.

Rod Hutton (Independent)

I have made it clear in my campaign and on my campaign website - www.rod4derbyshirepcc.com that I am opposed to the privatisation of our police service in Derbyshire. As someone who works in the business & commercial world I understand profit & loss accounts and balance sheets but this is an essential public service that needs objectivity, impartiality, and experience, and where there are efficiencies or savings then these should be ploughed back into the service and NOT given to shareholders. I find that approach quite abhorrent. This view obviously comes on the back of 19yrs service as an MSC officer up to Inspector level with the Metropolitan Police in London and in my business & commercial experience getting businesses back onto their feet either before or post administration of the company. Having also worked with Europe's largest Spa company as head of group revenue with units in India, France, & Switzerland I have a raft of different experiences to bring to this role but fundamentally have a problem with profit for an essential public service.

I have many close friends & colleagues within the policing world from PCSO to senior management who all encouraged me to go for this role to also help ensure that the public had a voice in their local policing services that works alongside Community Safety Initiatives and that there are no dotted line responsibilities to any London political party HQ. Having moved here to start a family 7yrs ago Derbyshire needs will come first.

Simon Spencer (Conservatives)

Thank you for contacting me about the the future of Derbyshire Police. I can can absolutely confirm that there is no question of privatising the police. As the Home Secretary has made crystal clear, the crime fighters will remain police officers, patrolling will not be privatised and policing will remain a public service, accountable to the people and carried out by consent. The law prevents the jobs police officers do from being delivered by private contractors beyond the limited powers of transport and custody conferred by the last labour government.
When it comes to the work that goes on behind the scenes- things like administration, IT and maintenance- if savings can be made by collaborating with other forces, other emergency services, local authorities or private companies I will look at them. It is vital that as much of our policing budget as possible is directed to front line policing, and not wasted on expensive and inefficient administration.
I can confirm that I have no ties to any private companies such as G4S.

Devon and Cornwall

Brian Blake (LibDems)

I take the view that the Police are a public service and that all its functions should be discharged as that. Private companies are there for one reason only, to make a profit for shareholders. As a former copper if I get the job I will uphold that principle. The public needs the best service. There are many examples where privatising has lead to a lowering of standards and it is essential that this is not introduced into the police service.

I have no connection with any companies connected with security or indeed any others.

Brian Greenslade (Independent)

I am not in favour of the privatisation of Police services, I lack confidence in companies like G4S and I have no connections with such companies.

Graham Calderwood (Independent)

I am not political so not idealogically opposed to it or indeed am not hell bent on it like the present and even past Governments in other areas than the Police Force.

I cannot see it is appropriate for any work the Police officers themselves do. If warranted officers do things at present I cannot see anything that can be done by less qualified people at all. I would not think that appropriate.

Perhaps some services TO the police could be considered. But only if there would be a worthwile saving; it was done better ; there is no risk.

I would be concerned as to risk of confidentiality being compromised particularly. For example an elector asked me about outsourcing the payroll. I asked the Force Treasurer team and learned only 5 personnelwere so employed so the savings seem very small and not worthwile.

I would also be concerned in that example, that confidential names and addresses of police officers could be compromised for example

Cleaners etc of cells and custody centres might be outsourced ; that sort of thing as there it would not involve use of computers at all so even safeguarding their use would not be necessary. I struggle to think of other examples where it could be considered but I hope that example helps

I have no agenda to privatise. I and my family have no connections to any company that might be interested in such

Ivan Jordan (Independent)

I stand very firmly against the privatisation of the police. I believe the constabulary should operate together as one team, notwithstanding there may be different specialities within that. I would do not support the privatisation of control room staff, and I have heard there are problems with the outsourcing of forensics. At the very least, I believe operational involvement, such as control room, should be police officers dealing with each other, so everyone knows the job, and no corporation can influence matters covertly.

I made the pledge of No Privatisation at the very start of my campaign, and it stands to this day as a key, unequivocal statement on my website. http://www.jordanforpcc.co.uk/pledge4.php

I also stood firm on this point when interviewed on BBC spotlight, broadcast last Monday.

In the meantime, some other candidates have also declared against privatisation. They have recognised that this is big issue. For me, it has always been something I needed to fight for.

John Smith (Independent)

When this election campaign started I was offered a rubber wrist strap that has on it the words ' Stop Police Privatisation'. I have worn it constantly, all through the campaign, explained its significance to a number of people who have asked about it and intend to stick by that principle if elected as Commissioner.

To answer your questions:

I have no intention of approving the privatisation of any part of the Police Service - I do not, at this time, know if any arrangements have already been made.
No, G4S and their like will not be involved in running any part of the Devon and Cornwall Police Service whiled I am Commissioner.
No, I have no company contacts of this sort.

Nicky Williams (Labour)

Keeping Police on the beat.

When I meet people on the doorstep, I hear how worried they are about the creeping privatisation of our Police - and I hear the same from serving Officers. Companies like G4S are more interested in profit than public service; I am interested in having a visible police presence on the streets of our towns and city to prevent crime and provide a fast response. In more remote, rural areas people want to know that they can call on a Police Officer, not a security guard.

What is probably not clear enough from this pledge is that when I talk about opposing the privatisation of police I also mean services provided by police staff, such as call handling, PCSOs, forensics etc. I firmly believe that it should be possible for the Police to provide services which are of a better quality and are as cost effectively as anything that can be provided by the private sector. Privatisation will not be an option should I be elected as Police and Crime Commissioner for Devon, Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.

Robert Smith (UKIP)

I am completely against any police privatisation and so is UKIP

Tam Macpherson (Independent)

It is a first priority that our police service remains a public body with dedicated professional warranted constables.

Yet let's not be naive to the facts that our police manpower is stretched, facing some difficult and complex challenges in the immediate future.

We must stabilise our police officer numbers. It should be a primary goal to get the maximum numbers of uniformed warranted officers deployed in front line roles; active within the community.

Our police service is already subject to outsourcing. Central government site efficiency and cost effectiveness. The realities are that privatisation to further secondary role services, at a national level, is inevitable.

It is essential that the Commissioner and Chief Constable,in partnership, formulate a well resourced realistic strategy in future front line manning levels. Synchronised shifts, working hours, local priorities and policy much meet residential and business needs.

Over all strategic and financial policy will be within the Commissioner's control. Direction and command will remain with the Chief Constable.

We're a few years off futuristic 'Robocop style' private policing and Judge Dredds.

I have no interests in any private security firms.

Tony Hogg (Conservatives)

The law prevents the jobs police officers do from being delivered by private contractors beyond the limited powers of transport and custody conferred by the last Labour government.

I can absolutely confirm that there is no question of privatising the police. As the Home Secretary has made crystal clear, the crime fighters will remain police officers, patrolling will not be privatised and policing will remain a public service, accountable to the people and carried out by consent.

When it comes to the work that goes on behind the scenes - things like administration, IT and maintenance - if savings can be made by collaborating with other police forces, other emergency services, local authorities or private companies I will look at them. It is vital that as much of our policing budget as possible is directed to frontline policing, and not wasted on expensive and inefficient administration.

William Morris (Independent)

Dorset

Andy Canning (LibDems)

I will not privatise Dorset police services.

I will not allow G4S or similar companies within a mile of any responsible position that I am involved with.

I have no link to any companies that might be interested in police contracts.

Martyn Underhill (Independent)

Can you promise not to privatise Dorset police services?
In relation to privatisation yes I can. However, what a lot of people using the word 'privatisation' are mainly concerned about is out-sourcing. Choosing an external organisation to run a function that has, to that point, been managed in house. Would I consider out-sourcing if I were Dorset's Police and Crime Commissioner? Yes, in certain circumstances I would. There are very many different forms of out-sourcing and the bodies undertaking them can be from the private, public or even third (voluntary) sectors. I consider the Voluntary Sector the best approach, because from my experience, they provide better value for money and outcomes.

Will you allow companies like G4S to get involved in the running of Dorset police?
As contractors, yes, but not as a Company for profit taking a permanent role away from the police. For example, however, some measures may make sense, as contractors.Last year, there was a murder, where the incident was spread over hundreds of yards. It cost tens of thousands of pounds to protect forensically. That was because the scene guardswere six police officers being paid 25 [pounds] ph each, some on overtime. In reality, 4 private security guards, costing 6 [pounds] ph, could have been used, supervised by two police officers. A short term 2 day contract, that makes financial sense.

Do you have any connection to companies that might be interested in police contracts?
No

Nick King (Conservatives)

I don't support 'privatisation' of the police. But then the word 'privatisation' used by so many at the moment is entirely wrong in this context. Let's be clear about the definition of privatisation - it means the transfer of services from the public to the private sector irreversibly, who then run independently.

What those using the word 'privatisation' are concerned about is out-sourcing. Choosing an external organisation to run a function that has, to that point, been managed in house.

Would I consider out-sourcing if I were Dorset's Police and Crime Commissioner? Yes, I would.

If an external body can run a service better and more efficiently than it can be delivered within the organisation then I would look at that. There is of course a caveat to that statement - running a service 'better' means amongst other things retaining the confidence of both its customers and colleagues who have to work alongside it. That's the reason I don't believe that frontline policing should be considered for out-sourcing. I think the public have an expectation that police officers and staff undertake certain jobs, not just on the streets, but also in police custody suits and similar behind the scenes roles.

There are very many different forms of out-sourcing and the bodies undertaking them can be from the private, public or even third (voluntary) sectors. Dorset Police Authority already out sources some of its finance and HR functions to Dorset County Council for example. The financial landscape the first Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner will inherit is going to be really, really tough. If there is an opportunity, through working in partnership with other organisations to reduce cost elsewhere in order that resources can be concentrated on frontline, local policing then I wouldn't hesitate to look at any option.

I've been clear about how I view G4S too. And the best thing I can do is to point you in the direction of this article I wrote on my website back in July: http://www.nick4dorsetpcc.org.uk/news/would-i-outsource-g4s

I have no contact whatsoever with any companies that would be interested in working for the Police. I've been open too about all the contact I've had from businesses while standing in this election. That detail is here: http://www.nick4dorsetpcc.org.uk/transparency .

Rachel Rogers (Labour)

I have stated publicly on many occasions that I am against privatisation of the police and firmly believe that policing should be a public service, not for profit. I am similarly committed to public service prisons - I find it less than ethical for the state to take away a person's liberty and then allow a private company to make a profit from incarceration.

However, the Government's 20% cuts to policing are well in excess of the 12% that HMIC said was feasible. I am therefore suspicious that the Government's aim is to enforce the privatisation of core services and to pressurise even the most pro-public service candidates (of which I would be one) to make near-impossible decisions. However, my commitment will always be to publicly accountable in-house police services other than for areas where it is sensible and logical to contract out - fleet management, uniform suppliers and IT/telephone infrastructure for example.

I was interested to hear at Labour Party Conference in early October that even G4S don't think the private sector have a place in core policing tasks such as patrolling. They want to run custody services, but in my opinion it is much better to run such services in-house with directly employed public servants.

I do not have any connection with any companies that might be interested in police contracts. Since I was selected as a candidate I have received letters from companies that would fit that criterion and have attended seminars and conferences where such companies have also been present. In order to be as open about these contacts I have published a full list on the Transparency page of my website: http://www.rachelrogers.net/ A copy of the G4S letter can be found here.

Durham

Kingsley Smith (Independent)

I do not support the privatisation of the Police Force and would not support G4S running our front line.

I have no connections with companies who might be interested in police contracts.

Mike Costello (UKIP)

All police forces use private companies and cannot operate without them.

The trick is to make sure that they do not influence how the policing is achieved and provide true value for money.

The police are notorious for believing what companies promise.

In the eighteen years I was in IT with Durham I was the most hated (I do not overstate) by private companies for holding them to strong contracts.

Nick Varley (Conservatives)

Can you promise not to privatise Durham police services?
Will you allow companies like G4S to get involved in the running of Durham police?
Do you have any connection to companies that might be interested in police contracts?

1. No, I won't give that assurance because I'm not ideologically opposed to private companies doing work more efficiently and at a lower cost to the taxpayer than the public sector can do it. I will be quite clear though that at the moment I do not consider there to be a need to bring in any private companies.

2. I do not consider that currently there is a need for private companies, but I will not rule out the possibility of it ever happening.

3. No.

Ron Hogg (Labour)

I oppose privatisation and will not have any dealings at all with G4S, we saw their performance at the Olympics.

Finally I have no business connections of any nature.

Dyfed Powys

Christine Gwyther (Labour)

As commissioner I will have to ensure the decisions I take are accountable, proportionate and legal. I have worked in the public sector for many years, both as an officer and as a representative and on some occasions have seen privatised services work reasonably well. However, I have seen more occasions where things went wrong, and services had to be rescued. The recent debacle of the security arrangements for the otherwise triumphant and splendid London Olympics has shown us that when contracts are let, private companies can promise the world and deliver nothing.

I intend to honour the principle of policing by consent. The overwhelming message I am receiving in this campaign is that the public do not trust the concept of private security firms but that they do (with checks and balances) continue to trust their police force.

Some services will need to be reviewed to see if they provide best value. Our IT service, for example, is performing well. I will want to see it benchmarked against other, similar services to make sure we are getting best value. That will go a long way to protect both the service and the people who work in it.

G4S or other, similar companies would have to convince me:
(a) That they would provide better value for money than our current, in house officers and staff. That means not just slapping in a low bid, but providing a coherent and credible business plan with targets and timings.
(b) That they would be able to honour contracts to the letter, and on time. Considering their recent track record, that is a big ask, and I am no pushover.
(c) That they would command the respect and trust of the public of Dyfed Powys. The public are telling me in no uncertain terms that they would not.

I have no connection to companies that might be interested in police contracts. I currently work for the Co-operative, and am a member of the National Park Authority. I have been a local government officer, a Welsh Assembly Member and a Welsh Government minister, all of which provide me with relevant experience. If I thought my background would conflict with the position of Police and Crime Commissioner and my ability to provide fair decision making and strong leadership, I would not have stood for election.

Christopher Salmon (Conservatives)

I am against privatising core police services. Policing is a public service, paid for by the taxpayer for the benefit of all. I will keep it that way, if I am elected.

Sometimes outsourcing back office roles like administration, maintenance or IT can save money for the frontline. If it means more officers on the beat, I think that is a good thing and will look at it.

I do not have connections with companies who might be seeking contracts.

Essex

Andrew Smith (UKIP)

I have had so many queries on this subject I have made up a standard answer. I hope it is clear - efficiency YES, privatisation of any operational activity NO!

I have said in debate that I recognise the potential for savings and efficiency by using the private sector, for example maintaining buildings and vehicles, IT networks and communications etc.

However I have also made it clear that I do not agree with hollowing out the police. The police should be able to carry out their role, which is very different to most other public or private sector roles, without being dependent on outside agencies for operational purposes.

I am against privatising scene of crime security or investigation; I think forensic work has gone too far to the private sector while the idea of outsourcing fraud investigation, as has been mentioned in some quarters, would be totally unacceptable to me.

I have worked in the private sector all my life. I have never worked for G4S or any similar organisation. Mostly I have worked in the Lloyd's insurance market handling insurances for international and commercial risks.

Linda Belgrove (Independent)

My natural instinct is to retain police services "in house", and not to privatise (or "outsource"). I feel that is the best way to maintain standards of training and professionalism. I feel that is the best way to make services accountable, through me as Commissioner, and through the Chief Constable for those officers and staff under his or her direction and control. I am particularly concerned to maintain the quality of service to the public, and to protect officers and staff in their day to day work. Functions such as custody, or forensics, are absolutely vital, and while cost is important, safety and quality of service to me are paramount.

It would be unrealistic for any Commissioner ever to wholly rule out using external providers for some services, but there would need to be a convincing case made taking fully into account issues such as quality of service, accountability, continuity and risks. Any such proposal would be discussed openly and transparently, and all interested groups would be fully consulted, including the public and staff and officers' associations.

I have no interests in any companies offering support services to the Police.

Mick Thwaites (Independent)

Can you promise not to privatise Essex police services (I would personally add 'wholly or in part')
Will you allow companies like G4S to get involved in the running of Essex police?
Do you have any connection to companies that might be interested in police contracts?

Tony thanks for questions short answer is Yes,No,No

Nicholas Alston (Conservatives)

Can you promise not to privatise Essex police services?
Will you allow companies like G4S to get involved in the running of Essex police?
Do you have any connection to companies that might be interested in police contracts?

1. I would have no intention whatsoever of privatising front line police work. But I do want police officers engaged in front line police work and not in support work that could be carried out by non-police staff, as much is now. I would have an open mind about whether the public or private sector should provide those support services and I would consider all factors such as cost and quality and reliability of service and the need to retain expertise and capacity within the public sector. We all know G4S has not covered itself in glory.

2. See above. I would not permit any private company to be involved in running the police force.

3. Yes, in a consultancy capacity I have been an adviser to a UK company that supplies very specialist technical equipment to police forces ( I do not even know if it has ever supplied to the Essex Police). I am glad to have had that role as I have maintained knowledge of some important technical issues relevant to policing. If appointed I would remove myself from any decision to buy from that company, and I would cease my consulting role.

Robin Tilbrook (English Democrats)

Unlike the Conservatives I certainly can assure you, do and indeed already have, on the record, stated that I would not privatise any police services, nor do I have any connection whatsoever to any companies that might be interested in police contracts.

Val Morris-Cook (Labour)

I do not believe that it is the right move to privatise our police services It is a step too far to imagine a security service patrolling our streets or involved in investigative work. I will also commit to transparency over meetings and contacts with lobbyists and in the decision-making process of any existing or new public private partnerships. As whether we like it or not any PCC will be lobbied. But I will do everything I can to protect our Police.

I do currently work for Wincanton who are a logistic company, As far as i am aware they are not looking at the Police Service as a new work stream, They do provide some of the the prison vans for Serco

Gloucestershire

Alistair Cameron (LibDems)

My response to your questions is:

1. I will not privatise Gloucestershire Police Service.
2. I will not allow companies such as G4S to get involved in the running of Gloucestershire Police.
3. I have no connection with companies that might be interested in police contracts.

Martin Surl (Independent)

Regarding privatisation I have to some extent covers this in my manifesto, I used the words, - 'I will not allow the Constabulary's operational efficiency to become reliant upon private sector organisations and contracts'. In more detail this means it is my intention to keep all the core services in police hands. There is a place for private business and who runs the canteen or provides the printing is another matter.

I have absolutely no connection with G4S or any other business.

Rupi Dhanda (Labour)

Can you promise not to privatise Gloucestershire police services?
I have no plans to privatise policing. In the past year we have seen the debacle involving G4S at the Olympics and we have also seen the closure and privatisation of the world renowned Forensic Science Service. This led to urine samples from drink driving offences being left unchecked in fridges. I am not anti private sector - I work in the private sector. But I do not want to see market forces introduced in to our justice system.

Will you allow companies like G4S to get involved in the running of Gloucestershire police?
Absolutely not.

Do you have any connection to companies that might be interested in police contracts?
None whatsoever. I am a family solicitor based in Tewkesbury.

Victoria Atkins (Conservatives)

Thank you for contacting me about the future of Gloucestershire police. I can absolutely confirm that there is no question of privatising the police. As the Home Secretary has made crystal clear, the crime fighters will remain police officers, patrolling will not be privatised and policing will remain a public service, accountable to the people and carried out by consent. The law prevents the jobs police officers do from being delivered by private contractors beyond the limited powers of transport and custody conferred by the last Labour government.

When it comes to the work that goes on behind the scenes - things like administration, IT and maintenance - if savings can be made by collaborating with other police forces, other emergency services, local authorities or private companies I will look at them. It is vital that as much of our policing budget as possible is directed to frontline policing, and not wasted on expensive and inefficient administration.

Greater Manchester

Matt Gallagher (LibDems)

This summer, my son Will, who is a Royal Marine Commando, had to give up a part of his summer leave at short notice to provide security at the London Olympics. He was able to give me a very graphic and detailed account of the shambles that was G4S. Having had such a briefing I can honestly say I wouldn't pay them in washers.

I am a retired police officer and have never had, in any way whatsoever, any connection with the private security business. Indeed, I have stated publicly that I will not accept contributions from ANY business towards my campaign.

Michael Winstanley (Conservatives)

I can absolutely confirm that there is no question of privatising the police. As the Home Secretary has made crystal clear, the crime fighters will remain police officers, patrolling will not be privatised and policing will remain a public service, accountable to the people and carried out by consent. The law prevents the jobs police officers do from being delivered by private contractors beyond the limited powers of transport and custody conferred by the last Labour government.

When it comes to the work that goes on behind the scenes - things like administration, IT and maintenance - if savings can be made by collaborating with other police forces, other emergency services, local authorities or private companies I will look at them. We face a number of challenges over the next few years and the way things are done will need to be reviewed but where possible I will look to keeping services in house if at all possible as long as the quality of service is maintained or improved and it is value for money for the taxpayer. It is vital that as much of our policing budget as possible is directed to frontline policing.

I want to make it quite clear that I have no link whatsoever to companies that may be interested in providing services to the Police.

Roy Warren (Independent)

Thank you for your e-mail. Under no circumstance would I allow privatisation of the police force however politicians would have no choice but to obey the whip of Westminster. I also have no connection to any companies that may be awarded police contracts.

Steven Woolfe (UKIP)

The Labour party started privatisation of the Criminal Justice system and coalition continue it. For example G4S already have contracts to transport prisoners.

UKIP and I do not believe in privatisation of the police nor do I have links with companies with contracts with the police. However, please note that thousands of people who hold pensions or unit trusts may do so as their pension companies may invest in G4S , Compass etc.

Tony Lloyd (Labour)

I am very clear, and I know that the public agree, that our Police are a public service and that's how it should stay. Recent attempts by police forces like West Midlands and Surrey to link up with private organisations like G4S will not be repeated in Greater Manchester if I'm there as Commissioner to stop it.

If the only issue is getting the cheapest offer around then tendering out to the private sector might be right but policing is a public service and the public want what is good rather than what's cheap enough

Gwent

Chris Wright (Independent)

No response forwarded to office

Hamish Sandison (Labour)

I am happy to confirm that I am totally opposed to privatisation of the police force in Gwent. I believe strongly that our police force should remain in the public sector. I gave a pledge to this effect


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